Sample Report

Gambling is common and responsible gambling can be fun and exciting. In fact about three-quarters of Canadians gambled in the last year. The most common types of gambling that Canadians participate in are lotteries and instant win tickets.

This report will help to give you a picture of your gambling and let you know how your gambling compares with other adults.


How Many Types of Gambling?

In the past year you reported taking part in 13 different type(s) of gambling. This means that you take part in more types of gambling than 99.9% of Canadian adult men. 

You told us that you took part in the following gambling activities:

  • Instant win (or scratch) tickets, or daily lottery tickets
  • Lottery tickets such as Lotto 6/49, Super 7, raffles or fund-raising tickets
  • Bingo
  • Playing cards or board games with family or friends
  • Video Lottery Terminals (VLTs) outside of casinos
  • Video Lottery Terminals (VLTs) at casinos
  • Casino games other than coin slots or VLTs (for example: poker, roulette, blackjack, Keno)
  • Internet or arcade gambling
  • Live horse racing at the track or off track
  • Sports lotteries (Sport Select, Pro-Line, Mise-au-jeu, Total), sports pools or sporting events
  • Speculative investments such as stocks, options or commodities
  • Games of skill such as pool, golf, bowling or darts
  • Other forms of gambling such as dog races, gambling at casino nights / country fairs, bet on sports with a bookie or gambling pools at work

How much do I Spend on Gambling?

Based on the information you gave us, you spent approximately $1,000.00 in the last month on gambling.

With this money, you could have bought:


new computer beach vacation movie passes
A new computer a vacation 100 movie passes


In the last year the largest amount you’ve spent on any given day was $2,009.00.

You also reported spending more than $1000 on gambling in the last year. This means you spent more money on gambling in the last year than 95.5% of Canadian adult men.

How does my Gambling Compare to Others?

Now take a look and see how the gambling activities you take part in at least once a month compare to other Canadian adult men. The highlighted section outlines where you fit:

You told us that you buy instant win/scratch tickets or daily lottery tickets daily. This means that you buy instant win/scratch tickets or daily lottery tickets more often than 99.5% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you buy tickets such as 6/49 and Super 7, raffle tickets or fund-raising tickets daily. This means that you buy tickets such as 6/49 and Super 7, raffle tickets or fund-raising tickets more often than 99.9% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play bingo for money between 2 to 6 times a week. You play bingo for money more often than 99.7% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play cards or board games for money between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you play cards or board games for money more often than 99.5% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play Video Lottery Terminals outside of a casino between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you play Video Lottery Terminals outside of a casino more often than 99.7% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play coin slots or Video Lottery Terminals in a casino between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you play coin slots or Video Lottery Terminals in a casino more often than 99.9% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play casino games other than coin slots or Video Lottery Terminals (for example: poker, roulette, blackjack, Keno) between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you play casino games other than coin slots or Video Lottery Terminals (for example: poker, roulette, blackjack, Keno) more than 99.8% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play Internet or arcade games for money between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you play Internet or arcade games for money more often than 99.9% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you bet on live horse racing at the track or off track between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you bet on live horse racing at the track or off track more often than 99.9% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you play sports lotteries or bet on sports pools or sporting events between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you play sports lotteries or bet on sports pools or sporting events more often than 99.3% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you buy speculative investments such as high-risk stocks, options or commodities between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you buy speculative investments such as high-risk stocks, options or commodities more often than 99.7% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you bet on games of skill such as pool, golf, bowling or darts between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you bet on games of skill such as pool, golf, bowling or darts more often than 99.3% of Canadian adult men.

You told us that you spend money on other forms of gambling such as dog races, gambling at casino nights / country fairs, bet on sports with a bookie or gambling pools at work between 2 to 6 times a week. This means that you spend money on other forms of gambling such as dog races, gambling at casino nights / country fairs, bet on sports with a bookie or gambling pools at work more often than 99.8% of Canadian adult men.

Problem Gambling Index (PGI)


The PGI score shows whether a person’s gambling should be considered a problem. High scores usually mean serious problems. The chart below is in the shape of a pyramid to show that there are more people with low PGI scores than high PGI scores.

Your PGI score is 24. The green area of the chart shows where your score falls:

Problems Resulting from Gambling

You told us that within the last year, the following problems resulted from your gambling:
  • I bet more than I could really afford to lose
  • I needed to gamble with larger amounts of money to get the same feeling of excitement
  • I’ve gone back another day to try to win back the money I lost
  • I borrowed money or sold something to get money to gamble
  • I felt that I might have a problem with gambling
  • I’ve been criticized for betting or told that I had a gambling problem, regardless of whether or not I thought this was true
  • I felt guilty about the way I gamble, or what happens when I gamble
  • My gambling was causing me health problems, including a feeling of stress or anxiety

Beliefs about Gambling

In recent years, quite a bit of research has shown that many people have specific thoughts or beliefs about gambling. These thoughts and beliefs often influence how a gambler will “strategize” their play, how much money they’ll bet, and how much longer they’ll play (when on a winning or losing “streak”).

Often, many gamblers tend to believe that there’s a reliable way or special code that helps them predict or control gambling outcomes.

You reported having the following beliefs about gambling:
  • I pick my favourite places to play.
  • I try to figure out a way to win.
  • I think about how much money I could win.
  • I try to keep a winning attitude.
  • I spend time with people who I think are lucky.
  • I go with my gut instincts and feelings.
  • I try to figure out what my luckiest numbers are.
Although we realize that responsible gambling can be fun and exciting, researchers have looked into these beliefs and have found that the following is true:

The truth is you can't control your luck
It's tempting to believe that rituals, special places, and unique situations will give you an "edge" when it comes to predicting or controlling gambling outcomes.

But if you look back and think about your patterns of winning and losing, you'll notice that whether or not you're using any special form of "luck control" you lose more often than you win. Of course, there'll be times when a win is associated with some specific circumstance, but this will be quite rare, especially if you keep a record (your memory can be deceiving).

Also, you should consider if it's possible for a "lucky circumstance" to affect gambling outcomes - that is, how does the gaming machine (e.g., lottery computers) know that you're doing something that's supposed to bring the computer bad luck (e.g., betting your favorite numbers, going to your 'lucky' store)?

We sometimes use the idea of luck as a kind of influence that can work with, or against us. But the closer you examine the idea of luck, the more difficult it is to understand what exactly luck is and how it can possibly help you win. For example:

  • Where can luck be found?
  • What is luck made of?
  • Where can you buy it?
  • Is luck a thing, a feeling or a substance?
  • How does luck actually affect your future outcomes when you gamble?

Then there's the issue of how luck identifies you, either to give you good or bad luck. As you examine the idea of luck, it can become more difficult to actually believe that it actually exists or is a "force" that we can do anything about.

Finally, how do you know:

  • If something is lucky, or not lucky?
  • If a person, a place or a thing is lucky or unlucky?

If you go by whether you win or not, at the end of the day, almost everywhere you gamble will probably be unlucky!

The more you examine the superstitions around "luck", the more you become skeptical about how, for example, playing in a particular place or with certain people can affect an eventual gambling outcome.

Believing in "luck" may be emotionally satisfying (since it can make you feel more confident) but if you look at the actual evidence, the only thing you can rely on is that you'll lose, again and again and again, regardless of whether you do or don't believe in the superstition of luck.

There is no such thing as a "System". Period.
Betting "systems" are supposed to work by providing a technique or strategy that bypasses the random nature of gambling. But the truth is that it's mathematically impossible to have a system.

In the case of games where outcomes are randomly determined (e.g. slot machines, bingo, lotteries, or roulette) their outcomes can't be controlled or predicted at all (at least legally). It's the random nature of these games that guarantee the complete failure of any system.

In games where some skill is presumed (e.g. card games, race tracks or sports betting) the factors that affect the outcomes are so numerous that it's impossible to develop a reliable system that'll analyze all necessary information needed to determine an outcome. For example, the outcome of a horse race is affected by so many factors that it’s impossible for all of the different factors to be available at the right time so you’d be able to guarantee yourself a winning wager. This makes consistent prediction impossible - and so any "betting system" will fail, again, and again.

A good example is what's known as the "Martingale System". People often use the Martingale System on money games (like roulette). According to the Martingale System the bettor doubles each consecutive bet so that when they do eventually win, they’re able to cover all their losses - and perhaps even make a small profit.

The problem with the Martingale System is that eventually, the person betting will reach a point where they just can’t afford to double their bet after each loss.

For example, let's say that you're playing roulette and start off with a $20 bet and you lose. If you follow the Martingale System you’ll double, and your next bet will be $40, and then $80, and then $160, and then $320, and then $640, and then $1,280, and then $2,560, and then $5,120… per spin. And that's a total of $10,220 from only 9 spins. The tenth spin will cost you $10,240 (total $20,460 in only 10 spins). Very few people can afford to lose this much money.

At some point, you're going to run out of money - OR the "table limit" will be hit.

Remember: no matter what you bet, your percentage of return will always remain the same. This also means that even if you increase the frequency (how often) of your bets or the amount (how much) you bet – you also increase the amount you lose when your system fails.

Money fantasies are, quite simply, fantasies
We all like to dream and fantasies of winning it big and all you could do with your winnings can be a powerful motivator. In the excitement of the moment these fantasies can cloud your judgment and cause you to bet more and more so you can hit "the big one".

And the more you value money (and all it can do for you), the more you'll be tempted to do whatever it takes to get more of it. But in reality, gambling is random and uncontrolled, and the more you lose the more frustrated you feel as your fantasies slip away.

While it's true that someone will eventually win, the odds of it being you are astronomically low. For example, 1 in 14 million will win a lottery jackpot. Now think of the population of your entire town. How many times do you have to double the number of people in your town before you reach a population of 14 million?

In some games (e.g., race track, card games) the chance of winning is higher than 1 in 14 million. Both those games pay out lower and rarely pay back enough money to make you wealthy - or allow you to quit your day job. So believing that it'll be you who'll win the "big jackpot" is, well, wishful thinking. Don't let fantasies of wealth and power affect what's really just a game - a game that can be fun to play but very rarely makes anyone wealthy.

As your gambling debts pile up it can become more and more tempting to fantasize that the big jackpot is closer, or that when you win your financial problems will go away. This kind of thinking can keep you betting more and more money, when the wisest thing would be to stop.

Having "the right attitude" will not help you win
If having the right attitude, praying to a Higher Power, rubbing a good-luck charm or "trying hard" did work, then most gamblers would've already won the big jackpot and be retired somewhere on a beach.

While having the right attitude will certainly help you have fun and feel excited about playing, the right attitude will not affect the outcomes of lottery computers, slot machines (which are also computers), horses, or sports athletes.

Although we're often told that wanting something badly enough is all it takes to get it, it doesn't apply to gambling. A positive attitude is not enough to make you win. Even if positive attitudes are usually associated with winning (who doesn’t feel positive when they win?) a positive attitude has nothing to do with gambling.

Gambling outcomes are not affected by what goes on in our minds.

There's not a single person in history that's been able to predict winning
Even though, at times, there seems to be an association between our hunches, gut feelings and gambling outcomes, there are many, many more times that our hunches and instincts don't work out.

Our memory tends to be selective and overestimates how often our predictions actually work. Usually these feelings are more the results of wishful thinking, adrenaline or anticipation rather than having any real ability to predict the future.

Also, beware of putting faith into your ability to make predictions after you win. Winning can make you feel more confident but look at the overall pattern. Are there really reliable connections between gambling instinct and winning? Can you really predict the future?

There is no such thing as "special numbers"
Although certain numbers seem to have special significance for many people (e.g., 7, 11 or 13) - when it comes to gambling all numbers are created equal.

Some people choose the same set of 6 numbers for each lottery draw and believe this gives them an edge (frequently these numbers represent birth dates, anniversaries, age, etc.) over numbers that are chosen randomly. The truth is that the probability of winning on any one day is the same for both.

For example, If the lottery has a choice of 49 numbers, then imagine a very large hat containing one ticket for every possible combination of 6 numbers. It would have to be a pretty big hat because in total, there'd be 1,906,884 tickets inside. On the day of the draw, only one ticket is picked. So no matter what numbers you choose, your odds are always 1 in 1,906,884.

Let's say you use a "special numbers" strategy. Your friend, on the other hand, picks her numbers randomly. Who has the better odds of winning? The truth is that you both have an equal chance of winning (and losing). Even though you both have an equal chance of winning, some people think that if you use the same numbers over-and-over, you have a better chance of having your numbers come up. This is simply not true.

Each lottery draw (or game) is an independent event and is not connected to any past draws. It doesn't matter what numbers were drawn in previous games and the probability of winning with your numbers today has absolutely no effect on the probability of winning tomorrow.

This is another example of what is known as a "gambler's fallacy". Some who fall into the gambler's fallacy believe that the longer the lottery goes without their special numbers coming up, the more likely their numbers will come up in the future.

It's the same thing when betting on sports or horses. How teams or horses win are based on so many different factors that it's impossible for anyone to have all of the necessary information to make a sure prediction (and that includes the teams' or horses' owners!).

We're not saying that responsible betting or gambling isn't fun, we're just pointing out that there's a reason why casinos, lotteries and betting houses never go bankrupt.

Low Risk Gambling


Many people enjoy gambling. Here are some suggested tips about gambling, developed by the Responsible Gambling Council, that have been found to reduce the risk of experiencing gambling problems.
  • Gamble for entertainment, not as a way to make money
  • Balance gambling with other leisure activities
  • Gamble together with friends or family, not alone
  • Don’t 'chase' losses; accept losses as the cost of entertainment
  • Only use discretionary income, not money for everyday expenses
  • Set a budget and stick to it
  • Don’t borrow money to gamble
  • Set a time limit and quit when the time is up
  • Take frequent breaks
  • Know that the risk of problems increases at times of loss or depression